Wodehouse Makes Fun of Fashionable Poets

From The Saturday Evening Post, Volume 188, comes a short story by P. G. Wodehouse, entitled, The Aunt and the Sluggard. This is 1925. The rise of fascism is occurring in real time, a muddled mush of aspiration, intellectual irresponsibility, and dark intent. Related is the “Life is real, life is earnest,” school of thought…

Using Archaisms: A Question of Good Taste

When and how should writers use archaic words? In what context, for what use, and to what effect? Some, even  most people in the writing/publishing business, will tell you that you should avoid archaic words altogether. And so you should, if you cannot be sure that you are using them artfully. But this is true of…

Writing Update

Three things. First, why I haven’t been blogging. We moved to the country and now I don’t have internet for my computer – just phone data! That may change soon but will likely remain limited. I’m loving the countryside, though. Second, the delay of the appearance of Her Rattiness. Back in March, I stayed up…

Announcing the Next Poet’s Challenge

So I have been casting about for another challenge, to pursue in the following two weeks. We may return to the first-line challenge another time, but I want to try something a little different. This time, I am going to propose a set of rhymes, that a famous poet used in one of his poems.…

Chesterton on Dickens

We are trying to get at G. K. Chesterton’s characteristic approach to what we call stereotype and what he called a vulgar joke or an established theme. But before we get into Chesterton, a word from our friendly neigborhood etymological dictionary. stereotype (n.) 1798, “method of printing from a plate,” from French stéréotype (adj.) “printed by means of a…