The Armistice Century in Poetry

The Armistice Century in Poesy November 11, 2017 Still we find it hard to go Where friendly harmonies can blow. Our songs have been self-punishment Ten decades long, and gray lament. We weary now of wearying And thin-lipped verse is growing thin: The closed-up throat, the furious brow, We might relax if we knew how.…

The Virtuous Artist: His Growth and Rarity (Illustration)

Do read the chart from bottom to top, please! I’m looking forward to a more detailed discussion, perhaps of individual artists. Michael’s question about Albrecht Durer sent me looking to create a coherent shorthand description of the “territory of value” on which an artist might be placed. I wonder how our readers would place Durer…

Is Sweet Poetry Bad Poetry?

Recently a friend told a brief story which was meant to illustrate the point that we often interpret others through a screen of our own tendencies. My friend was driving someone and became irritated when a badly parked truck blocked his access. He expressed irritation with the driver of the truck, then heard his passenger…

Five Poems: Poem 5, Being the Last Day of the Week

For those who aren’t sure, ‘scythe’ and ‘withe’ are both pronounced with the short ‘i’ sound. Scythe is a large implement for cutting tall grass, and withe is a thin twine of natural grass used to bind things. While some poems are not meant to be handicap accessible, they may become easier if  one doesn’t…

Five Poems: Poem 4, Natura

In medieval poetry, Natura often appeared as a goddess (which to Christian medievals would have been a literary convention that allowed them to show the workings of nature as something divine, a sort of mask of God.) Natura If I had understood a thing of what my nature told to me I might have had…